Hello my friend, yes it's me.

My (very high quality) blog needs a new username!!

I'm in San Diego when I'm not in Chicago.

I complain and post stupid cool things that I like.

♡ask♡

♡here lies me♡

♡music I like♡

♡you can also find me here!♡

This has been an "about me".

ヽ(´ー`)


Sep 1st | 207,121 notes
Sep 1st | 11 notes
Aug 31st
Anonymous: different

… go onnnnnn …

Aug 30th | 208 notes
All Is Full of Love - Björk
Aug 29th | 859 notes

(Source: thedesignfiles.net)

Aug 29th | 71 notes
Aug 29th | 25 notes

Today, I had an appointment with my former professor because I was unsure whether I would be able to accomplish my four year plan (which was disrupted by a change in majors halfway through my time in college).  She’s the director of fine arts at my school and is adamant about having me in another one of her classes (which are demanding) but my schedule for this semester is full… so she picked a class to teach next semester based on what I wanted to take and I’m inexplicably pleased. She even waived one of my classes that’s offered once every other year (I missed this course when it was offered for that one semester last year and needed it to fulfill the major— I dreaded the mere idea of being in this class because it felt like a waste of time) just so I could take her class instead. :’)
I’m going to walk on time at graduation with two majors!!! I will have a science and a fine arts degree.

I just wanted to make this post to say that if you’re studying something you’re enthusiastic about, it will show in your character. Your mentors will notice. It truly makes an impact to show that you care by going the extra mile to ask for their guidance. They will WANT to give you their all because they know you will do the best you can with what they have to offer you and because YOU DESERVE IT! It can make all the difference to you and your future when you make an honest effort towards being respectful and interested in all of the knowledge and resources your professors/teachers can provide.

Aug 25th | 5,848 notes sometimes-now:

Folding screen by Camilla Richter

sometimes-now:

Folding screen by Camilla Richter

(Source: krgkrg)

Aug 25th | 111,667 notes

(Source: octopussoir-)

Aug 23rd | 139,235 notes gayonthemoon1239:

rifa:

actualbloggerwangyao:

alvaroandtheworld:

ultrafacts:

Source For more posts like this, follow Ultrafacts

THE BEGINNINGS OF KAWAII

No, no, you have no idea. It actually IS the beginning of the whole so-called “kawaii culture”. And it started because girls started using mechanical pencils, which provided fine handwriting. After being banished (more precisely, during the 80s), this kind of writing started being used in products like magazines and make-up. And, during this time, icons we usually associate with the whole kawaii industry (like the characters from Sanrio) came to life too.
And what many people don’t realize is that this subculture was born as a way for young girls to express themselves in their own way. And it was also used as something against the adult life and the traditional culture, often seen as dull and boring and oppressive. By embracing cuteness, these young girls (and adult women, after a while) were showing non-conformation with the current standards.
So yep. Kawaii is important, and it all started with cute, simple handwritting a few hearts and cat faces in some girls’ school notebooks <3

!!!!!
NO OK THIS IS SO IMPORTANT!
This is also how the kawaii fashions started! Girls began dressing in cute and off beat styles for themsleves, they were criticized by adult figures telling them “you’ll never find a husband if you dress that way!” to which they began to reply “Good!”
All the japanese subcultures and fashions that evolved out of this became a rebellion to tradition and the starch gender roles and expectations the adults were forcing on the younger generations. As early as the 70s and still to this day you’ll see an emphasis on child-like fashion and themes in more kawaii styles and the dismissal of the male gaze with styles like lolita (a lot of western people assume lolita is somehow sexual due to the name of the fashion, but ask any japanese lolita and they will tell you that men hate the style and find it unattractive which is sometimes a large reason they gravitate towards the style - they can express their femininity and individuality while remaining independent and without the pressure to appeal to men)
Its so so so important to understand the hyper cute and ‘odd’ fashions of Japanese girls carry such a huge message of feminism and reclaiming of their own lives.   

so are you telling me that Japan’s punk phase was really the kawaii phase


I LOVE

gayonthemoon1239:

rifa:

actualbloggerwangyao:

alvaroandtheworld:

ultrafacts:

Source For more posts like this, follow Ultrafacts

THE BEGINNINGS OF KAWAII

No, no, you have no idea. It actually IS the beginning of the whole so-called “kawaii culture”. And it started because girls started using mechanical pencils, which provided fine handwriting. After being banished (more precisely, during the 80s), this kind of writing started being used in products like magazines and make-up. And, during this time, icons we usually associate with the whole kawaii industry (like the characters from Sanrio) came to life too.

And what many people don’t realize is that this subculture was born as a way for young girls to express themselves in their own way. And it was also used as something against the adult life and the traditional culture, often seen as dull and boring and oppressive. By embracing cuteness, these young girls (and adult women, after a while) were showing non-conformation with the current standards.

So yep. Kawaii is important, and it all started with cute, simple handwritting a few hearts and cat faces in some girls’ school notebooks <3


!!!!!

NO OK THIS IS SO IMPORTANT!

This is also how the kawaii fashions started! Girls began dressing in cute and off beat styles for themsleves, they were criticized by adult figures telling them “you’ll never find a husband if you dress that way!” to which they began to reply “Good!”

All the japanese subcultures and fashions that evolved out of this became a rebellion to tradition and the starch gender roles and expectations the adults were forcing on the younger generations. As early as the 70s and still to this day you’ll see an emphasis on child-like fashion and themes in more kawaii styles and the dismissal of the male gaze with styles like lolita (a lot of western people assume lolita is somehow sexual due to the name of the fashion, but ask any japanese lolita and they will tell you that men hate the style and find it unattractive which is sometimes a large reason they gravitate towards the style - they can express their femininity and individuality while remaining independent and without the pressure to appeal to men)

Its so so so important to understand the hyper cute and ‘odd’ fashions of Japanese girls carry such a huge message of feminism and reclaiming of their own lives.   

so are you telling me that Japan’s punk phase was really the kawaii phase

I LOVE